Tell us about your bad job: October Worker Forums (Updated)

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Unfair treatment of workers is all too common in British Columbia. Few people know their rights, and getting justice from a bad boss can be nearly impossible.

The BC Employment Standards Coalition is working for better employment laws and stronger enforcement for all workers. We want to make the issues about real people – and make the case for improvements.

Tell your story.

You’re invited to join us to share your story. You can tell us about a current problem or even something that happened within the past 10 years.

You can also learn about your workplace rights under the Employment Standards Act and other BC laws. If your case involves a legal violation, we will offer advice and help you to start a complaint if you want.

Interviews will be done by experienced advocates at the times and places listed below, no appointment necessary. You can tell us your name and employer, or choose to be anonymous. Plan to stay about an hour. If you will need a translator to help tell your story, please call one of the numbers below. Please help us get out the word about these forums by sharing this poster

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Tell us about your bad job: Metro Van Workers Forums in October

TELL US ABOUT YOUR BAD JOB

Photo of a man cleaning a window

Unpaid wages and overtime, impossible schedules, unfair firings and other unfair treatment of workers are all common in British Columbia. BC has employment laws, but few workers know their rights, and getting justice from a bad boss can be very difficult.

The BC Employment Standards Coalition is working for better laws and stronger enforcement for non-union workers. We need your stories to illustrate these problems – to make the issues about real people – and to help us make the case for improvements.

We invite you to one of our public forums to share your story.  You can tell us about a current problem, or something within the past 10 years. Interviews will be done by experienced advocates. You can tell us your name and employer, or choose to be anonymous.

You can also learn about your workplace rights under the Employment Standards Act and other BC laws. If your case involves a legal violation, we will offer advice and help you to start a complaint if you want.

So please drop in to any one of the following locations. No appointment is necessary.  Plan to stay about an hour. Please share this information with co-workers, friends, family and organizations. Click here for a draft leaflet.

  • Cloverdale
    • Tuesday, October 11th, from 11:00 am to 9:00 pm
    • 5783 – 176A Street (Unifor Local 780G Hall)
  • Central Burnaby
    • Wednesday, October 12th, from 11:00 am to 4:30 pm
    • Bonsor Recreation Complex
    • South Burnaby Metro Club room
    • 6550 Bonsor Avenue, Burnaby
  • East Vancouver
    • Thursday, October 13th, from 11:00 am to 9:00 pm
    • 130 – 2920 Virtual Way (near RenfrewSkytrain Station)
    • BC Government Employees Union office, Tsawwassen Room
  • Northeast Burnaby & Coquitlam 
    • Monday, October 17th, from 3:30 pm to  9:00 pm
    • Cameron Community Centre, Cedar Room
    • 9523 Cameron Street, Burnaby (near Lougheed Mall & Skytrain)
  • Central Vancouver
    • Wednesday, October 19th, from 10:00 am to 9:00 pm
    • Vancouver Public Library, Alma VanDusen Room
    • 350 West Georgia Street, Vancouver (Library Square)
  • New Westminster
    • Thursday, October 20th, from 10:00 am to 9:00 pm
    • 326 – 12th Street (Unifor Hall)

Contacts for further information:

  • Murray Gore 604-671-9141
  • David Fairey 604-430-6036
  • Joey Hartman 604-254-0703

Liquor server minimum wage reinforces sexism

BC Employment Standards Coalition members Kaitlyn Matulewicz and co-chair David Fairey published an important new op-ed in this week’s Vancouver Sun about the often-ignored linkage between provincial tipping regulations and sexual harassment:

the dependence workers have on customers for tips leaves workers vulnerable to enduring sexual harassment and sexualized behaviour from customers as a “price” to be paid for a tip — a form of institutionalized quid pro quo. If workers do resist by, for example, speaking up against customers who are harassing them, they risk losing a tip.

You can read the article in full at this link.

New documentary “Migrant Dreams” at DOXA Film Festival May 7th

Migrant workers, activists with Justicia for Migrant Workers and the filmmakers celebrating the sold-out premiere of Migrant Dreams in Toronto on May 1st, 2016.

Migrant workers, activists with Justicia for Migrant Workers and the filmmakers celebrating the sold-out premiere of Migrant Dreams in Toronto on May 1st, 2016.

Award-winning filmmaker Min Sook Lee’s new 90-minute film Migrant Dreams will be screening this week in Vancouver. This documentary explores the stories of migrant workers from Mexico, Jamaica, and Southeast Asia employed under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program in the greenhouses of Leamington, Ontario.

Migrant Dreams depicts how, for many farm workers, the dream of a well-paying job becomes a nightmare when they are deceived into paying outrageous fees to brokers and recruiters, and how their employers impose curfews, confiscate passports, and charge exorbitant rental fees for cockroach-infested apartments. This investigative exposé documents the struggle of a group of women from Indonesia who, with the help of Evelyn and Cathy, two tireless community activists, take a stand and confront their employer. Thus, it not only focuses on structural conditions of exploitation for migrant workers, but also their stories of strength, resilience and love.

The film will be shown on Saturday, May 7th, at Cinematheque in Vancouver, starting at 2:00 PM. Ticket information: http://www.doxafestival.ca/film/migrant

Interview with Min Sook Lee and Evelyn Encalada on CBC’s The Current: http://bit.ly/1T6S4F7